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Thrilling penguin news! Chile is killing an iron mine that would harm the waddly birds.

Photo by farenheit75/Flickr. Ah, Chile. While not typically top of mind for the average American, the unassuming coastal strip has quietly become a sort of … yang to our yin. The delicate floral sucking candy to our taste-bud-annihilating chocolate-caramel-peanut butter-sour-red-hot mouth bomb.And, increasingly, they are the #RESIST window sticker to America’s MAGA hat. While the Trump administration rolls back LGBTQ protections, Chile’s president is touting a marriage equality bill. While dozens of U.S. states are trying to regulate out as many Planned Parenthood clinics as the law will allow, Chilean lawmakers recently relaxed the country’s abortion ban, which was one of the world’s strictest (though their new law carves out several exceptions, the procedure is still largely banned in Chile, but still — progress!). Now, the skinny South American nation is once again playing the U.S.’s bizarro world doppelganger — by siding with a bunch of penguins in a dispute with a mining company. Photo by Martin Bernetti/Getty Images. According to an AFP report, Chile recently killed a $2.5-billion iron-mining project to save the health (and, potentially, lives) of thousands of the waddly little birds. The project was slated to be built just south of three islands where over 80% of the world’s Humboldt penguins live and would include a port to ship iron all over the world. A review by 14 agencies found that the plan failed to sufficiently guarantee that the animals would not be affected.”We are not against economic development or projects that are necessary for the country’s growth, but they must offer adequate solutions for the impact they will have,” Environment Minister Marcelo Mena told the AFP. That’s not just the polar opposite of what the U.S. would do. It’s the polar opposite of what the U.S. government actually is doing. Blowing up this mountain in Virginia to get at the coal underneath seems fine. Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images. In August, the Interior Departme

Entertainment

She was told that extreme sports aren't for blind folks. Now she's proving them wrong.

And now she’s helping others do the same thing. Nancy Stevens is an adventurer. She’s biked cross-country, walked the Grand Canyon, and climbed huge mountains. Image via Death to the Stock Photo. Nancy also happens to be blind.”I’m kind of a risk-taker, and I enjoy the challenge of it,” she says. Blind since birth, Nancy has never seen the view from the summit of a mountain she’s climbed or the ocean from a kayak she’s paddled. But that doesn’t mean she hasn’t had incredible experiences on each and every one of her adventures. Nancy having a great time kayaking. Image via Nature Valley. For Nancy, being out in nature, hearing the trees blowing in the wind, and feeling the kayak paddle cut through the water fills her with the same joy a sighted person might experience. Image via Death to the Stock Photo. That feeling translates over to the many endurance sports she’s tried.  “It’s fun to try different sports so that when I dream, I have all these experiences, and that’s part of my dreams,” Nancy explains. But she doesn’t just try her hand at sports, she pushes herself to the limit. In 1998, Nancy competed in the Nagano Winter Paralympics in cross-country skiing. She also happens to be the first blind woman to climb the Grand Teton Mountain. When she sets her cap at achieving a new athletic feat, you better believe she’s going to make it happen. Nancy at the summit of the Grand Teton. Image via Nature Valley. Today, she’s using her fearlessness to help other disabled people set out on their own adventures.She works as an outreach coordinator with Oregon Adaptive Sports, which organizes outdoor recreational activities to people with disabilities in order to help them be more active and independent. Nancy hugging an Oregon Adaptive Sports member after a race. Image via Nature Valley. If she can help people who also live with disabilities have unforgettable experiences, they’ll likely gain the confidence to try more exciting things. One memorable example of this