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Before you click 'send' on anything else, read this comic. It's important.

Everyone seems to be clicking “send” a bit too early nowadays. We officially live in a world where internet trigger-happy world leaders can send massive populations into a devolved tail spin with erratic tweets, posts, and subsequent responses. These posts can have far-reaching consequences, and in the haste to respond in kind we’ve forgotten that we’ve normalized this kind of attitude. Boulet is a French comic artist who has been writing about this for 15 years.Originally he started writing an autobiographical series, but when he realized how accessible it was to his readers, he decided to make it fictional. “So it’s mostly ‘drawn stand up comedy,'” he explains. “I’m the main character, but in the same way comedians are there own character when they are on stage. The purpose is not really to talk about me but about situations of everyday’s life everyone can relate to.” In his words, “The comic (below) was an anecdote about a Facebook mistake, I had basically two choices: Use it as a Facebook status to make my friends laugh or try to dramatize the whole process into an internal crisis to make it a story.” Comic by Bouletcorp, where it originally appeared. Used here with permission. ‌‌‌‌‌‌‌That “internal crisis” is something Boulet is very interested in. Boulet enjoys using the accessible medium of cartoons as a way to explore complex issues. He loves learning about and studying consciousness and neuroscience. His fans enjoy this. “There were fun discussions in the comments about how the brain works … the very idea that we have a parallel process that can interfere, overlap or get in conflict is actually a thing. What I found most intriguing about this story was to literally feel my hand freeze BEFORE I could put an explanation on the WHY it froze.”He also had a great suggestion as to figuring out the motivations behind certain posts. “We should always go on social networks with EEGs on. We would learn a lot.”After what we’ve seen on social media over the

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This life-changing program pairs combat vets with horses. The results are amazing.

A woman stopped Christianna Capra at the Marine Ball. “Thank you for saving my husband’s life,” the stranger said, before giving her a big hug. It wasn’t the first time Capra had been thanked so profusely. It won’t be the last. As the co-founder of Spring Reins of Life, a New Jersey nonprofit focused on equine-assisted psychotherapy, she has helped more than 700 combat veterans, nearly 1,000 high-risk youth, and 100 kids grieving or dealing with trauma. But Capra takes little of the credit. “The horses are the ones that do the work,” she says. “I’m merely a conduit that allows them to do the work.”In the video below, veterans take part in Spring Reins of Life’s “Operation Horse.” Read on to discover how this life-changing program came to be. Christianna “CC” Capra literally grew up a horse-person — well, almost. “From about the age of 2 to about 6, I became a horse,” Capra says with a laugh. “You had to feed me out of your hand and I wore one of my mother’s hair pieces — as a tail. So that was kind of how it started.” She was obsessed. Capra found ways to be around horses as much as possible and she got her own at 11 years old. Soon after though, she had to give up horses when she moved to New York in high school. It would be nearly a decade before Capra would be back in the saddle. In 1997, her job in publicity helped her afford her “horse habit” again, and Capra purchased a horse that’s still with her today. But it was an offhand suggestion at the veterinarian’s office that led Capra to her life’s work. Through one of her veterinarians, Capra learned about the Equine Assisted Growth and Learning Association (EAGALA). Founded in 1999, EAGALA is an international nonprofit association for professionals interested in using horses to address mental health needs. “I read the website start to finish and I pulled out my wallet and my credit card that night and signed up for both trainings, sight unseen,” she says. “I knew, beyond any shadow of a doubt, this was

Entertainment

These 23 photos prove that dogs are just as fed up with the world as humans are.

Over the past few weeks, millions of people around the world have taken to the streets to protest. Whether it was for the Women’s March or in response to Trump’s controversial executive order banning immigrants and refugees, people took action and flooded the streets and nearby airport terminals to demand change.But enough about them. It’s time we talked about their dogs.That’s right. Dogs around the world are fed up too. Want proof? Here are 23 protest dogs who pounded the pavement (with their paws!) along with their human counterparts.1. Take this stylish pup, Agador, who loves nasty women and doesn’t care who knows. Photo by @poochofnyc, shared with permission. 2. We’re not sure if this dog is tired of all the marching or all the BS. Good thing the sign does all the talking. Photo by Hector Guerrero/AFP/Getty Images​. 3. This fluffy pup knows exactly what we need more of: hugs. Photo by Sister Marches/Flickr. The line forms behind me. 4. As two of America’s greatest women, Amy Poehler and Tina Fey, once said, “Bitches get shit done.” Photo by Lluis Gene/AFP/Getty Images. 5. Repeat after this dog: Her voice matters! She is the future! Photo by Devon Christopher Adams/Flickr. 6. Know your strengths. Andre does. Photo by @woke_pupper/Twitter, shared with permission. Hey, we’ve gotta admire a dog who knows what he’s good at and is willing to take action. 7. Sometimes you’re too cool to wear a sign and you settle for a pink hat instead. Photo by Robert N. Clinton (CyberShutterbug)/Flickr. Same message, different medium. That’s one smart dog. 8. This bully is begging you to read it (the sign, duh) and weep. Photo by Sister Marches/Flickr. 9. Margaux just wants you to fight for your rights, OK? Photo by Kate Trainor, used with permission. 10. No ban. No wall. No questions about what this dog’s sign is asking you to do. Photo by Rachael Prokop/Greenpeace, shared with permission. 11. Man’s best friend. Woman’s best friend. Democracy’s best friend. Photo

Entertainment

Check out Budweiser's powerful Super Bowl ad celebrating immigrants.

‘Go back home!’ — a message immigrants have been hearing for a while now.
In 1857, a man named Adolphus Busch arrived in America. As an immigrant from Germany, he stood out. Some people didn’t like that. Like many other immigrants in the 1800s, he faced hardships on his journey to find his new home. But he finally made it to where he was meant to be. Busch, of course, is the Busch of Anheuser-Busch — the world’s largest beer producer. And it’s his American story being told in a new Super Bowl ad for Budweiser:Given today’s political climate, the ad’s pro-immigrant sentiment has people talking.The ad — showing Busch overcoming xenophobic attitudes held by early colonists — was released amid talks of President Donald Trump’s controversial U.S.-Mexico border wall and just days after Trump signed an executive order banning travel to the U.S. by green card holders and refugees from seven predominantly Muslim countries. The ban prompted protests in airports across the country. It resulted in Attorney General Sally Yates being fired by Trump for refusing to defend its legality. Lawyers swooped in immediately, many working pro bono, to defend those affected in transit. And dozens of celebrities and influencers slammed the ban as an attack on civil rights.And believe it or not, Anheuser-Busch dove into white-hot political territory with this ad … on accident. Demonstrators protest Trump’s travel ban in Chicago. Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images. Anheuser-Busch didn’t intend for the ad — which it’s been developing for nearly a year — to be political.The commercial was conceptualized long before Trump’s travel ban was signed and the announcement of his controversial proposal to pay for the U.S.-Mexico border wall using an import tariff. The brand wanted to “celebrate those who embody the American spirit” by recapping one of its founder’s early days in America — not throw in its two cents when it comes to immigration policy.Marcel Marcondes, vice president of m

Entertainment

Reddit's co-founder explains why Lady Liberty's light is dimming in an emotional letter.

This post, written for Reddit on Jan. 30, 2017, was intended to be an open letter to encourage other American Redditors to share their own or their family’s immigration stories. Within nine hours, it had a record score of over 90,000 points and over 25,000 comments. Many of these stories were far more eloquent and moving than my own. You can read them here.After two weeks abroad, I was looking forward to returning to the U.S., but as I got off the plane at LAX on Sunday, I wasn’t sure what country I was coming back to.President Trump’s recent executive order is not only potentially unconstitutional, but deeply un-American. We are a nation of immigrants, after all. In the tech world, we often talk about a startup’s “unfair advantage” that allows it to beat competitors. Welcoming immigrants and refugees has been our country’s unfair advantage, and coming from an immigrant family has been mine as an entrepreneur. Protesters hold signs during a demonstration at LAX on Jan. 29, 2017, against the immigration ban imposed by Trump. Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images. I am the son of an undocumented immigrant from Germany and the great-grandson of refugees who fled the Armenian genocide.A little over a century ago, a Turkish soldier decided my great-grandfather was too young to kill after cutting down his parents in front of him; instead of turning the sword on the boy, the soldier sent him to an orphanage. Many Armenians, including my great-grandmother, found sanctuary in Aleppo, Syria — before the two reconnected and found their way to Ellis Island. Thankfully they weren’t retained, rather they found this message:“Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, the wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door!”My great-grandfather didn’t speak much English, but he worked hard, and was able to get a job at Endicott-Johnson Shoe Company in Binghamton, New

Entertainment

When a Texas mosque burned down, a local synagogue took in the congregation.

When a Victoria, Texas, mosque burned down under mysterious circumstances on early Jan. 28, 2017, members were distraught. Photo by Victoria Islamic Center/Facebook. The fire, which collapsed the building, left the congregants of the Victoria Islamic Center without a place to worship. That is, at least, until members of a local Jewish congregation showed up at a mosque founder’s house with a key to their synagogue.  “This is sad for everyone in the community and as Jews we especially have to feel for the Muslim community. When a calamity like this happens, we have to stand together,” Robert Loeb, the synagogue’s president, told Reuters.Both communities are small — Victoria boasts a few dozen Jewish and about 100 Muslim residents — which synagogue officials said makes sticking together all the more important. “Everyone knows everybody, I know several members of the mosque, and we felt for them,” Loeb said.Others in the community pitched in as well. The Victoria Islamic Center, before the fire. Photo by Victoria Islamic Center/Facebook. A few days after the fire, local high school students rallied in support of the mosque, praying and planting trees. Donations to a GoFundMe page set up to raise money for rebuilding have exceeded $1 million. After an election year that saw an increase in anti-Semitic and Islamophobic incidents, Jewish and Muslim groups have been coming together to support one another. Back in November, the Islamic Society of North America and the American Jewish Committee joined forces to create the Muslim-Jewish Advisory Committee, with the goal of combatting hateful speech and violence toward members of either faith and pushing for expanded rights for religious and ethnic minorities.Meanwhile, groups like the Council on American-Islamic Relations and Bend the Arc Jewish Action have been leading protests and petitions against Donald Trump’s executive order barring travelers from Muslim nations from entering the United States.While it’s st