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How to take your panic over Trump and the environment and turn it into real action.

A lot of people are worried about the environment right now. And President Trump … well, he’s not helping. Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images. He’s called climate change a Chinese hoax, made no secret of his disdain for the Clean Power Plan, and signaled that he might withdraw the U.S. from the Paris climate deal. But here’s the thing: Though the political parties are divided, the American people are largely in agreement — we want to preserve the environment and take proactive steps against climate change. So, with that in mind…Here are 21 things anyone can do over the next four years to take action for the environment:1. Donate to organizations dedicated to environmental causes.You know that old adage about voting with your dollar? Now’s the time to put it to use. Check out organizations such as the Natural Resources Defense Council, Sierra Club, Ocean Conservancy, Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership, World Wildlife Fund, Alliance for the Great Lakes, Rainforest Trust, or the Conservation Fund.2. If you can’t donate yourself — well, how do you like marathons and bake sales?If donating money isn’t in the cards, you could try signing up for charity drives or races. The World Wildlife Fund’s Panda Nation program, for instance, can help you set up fundraisers that combine events like bake sales or marathons with charitable donations.3. Get your hands dirty by joining a citizen scientist project. A horseshoe crab. Image via iStock. Instead of just promoting science and nature conservation, how about getting involved yourself? Scientists need lay people to help collect important data from all around the country. There are a ton of these projects, from tracking horseshoe crabs in Delaware Bay to watching urban birds. PBS, National Geographic, and Scientific American have lists of citizen science projects for you to help out in your area. 4. Prefer to keep your hands on the cleaner side? Help with research by playing games online.No joke. Some of the

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Watch Audi's bold, touching, and totally feminist Super Bowl ad.

“What do I tell my daughter?””Do I tell her that her grandpa is worth more than her grandma? That her dad is worth more than her mom?” GIF via Audi/YouTube. “Do I tell her that — despite her education, her drive, her skills, her intelligence — she will automatically be valued less than every man she ever meets?””Or maybe, I’ll be able to tell her something different.” GIF via Audi/YouTube. Those are the narrator’s words in a powerful new Super Bowl ad by Audi that highlights pay inequity. Check it out below:  Clearly, Audi’s not shying away from using the big game to make a political statement.Pay inequity, a hot topic on the 2016 campaign trail, has become an increasingly important issue to many Americans.Today, women earn, on average, a measly 79 cents for every dollar a man makes. The wage gap is even more severe for women of color — with black women earning about 64 cents and Latina women earning about 56 cents for every dollar that finds its way into the wallet of a man doing the same job.That 79 cents figure, however, doesn’t quite tell the whole story.There are many factors that play into the wage gap aside from discrimination. For instance, women tend to leave the workforce when they have children (which sets them back on the pay scale in the long term) and are more likely to seek out jobs with more flexible hours at the expense of a higher salary, The Washington Post noted. There are other social factors at play, too, like the fact women are less likely to negotiate their starting salaries and are more hesitant to apply for a job that they’re not 100% qualified for (this isn’t the case for men). Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images. But again, that’s still only telling part of the story.The ad received a lot of criticism from viewers who jumped at the chance to explain why they think pay inequity isn’t a real problem.”Women at Audi work different jobs, which accounts for the perceived unequal pay,” a Twitter user criticized the brand.”Equal pay [s

Entertainment

He spent his life studying mosquitoes, and then it became personal.

After working in Senegal, this scientist accidentally discovered very important info about Zika.
On Aug. 30, 2008, Brian Foy had just gotten home from a research trip in Senegal, a country in West Africa, when he began to feel sick. Foy is a biologist specializing in insect-transmitted diseases and an associate professor at Colorado State University. He had been in rural Senegal with a graduate student researching malaria and noticed that when he got back, he felt not quite right. Foy (right) with equipment for aspirating mosquitoes in Senegal. Image via Brian Foy, used with permission. “It started out by me just feeling really exhausted,” Foy says. “It was hard to really know if this was just jet lag or not … and then that exhaustion just progressed into a vague headache. I really needed to cover my eyes and kind of shy away from the light.”He developed a rash across his torso and joint pain. He later got prostatitis as well. Foy immediately called the graduate student who had been working with him in Senegal. He had many of the same symptoms.Both suspected that their symptoms were classic signs of an arbovirus — a type of virus, such as dengue, that is often caught after being bitten by mosquitoes. The Aedes aegypti mosquito is the species that transmits the Zika, chikungunya, dengue, and yellow fever arboviruses. Photo by Luis Robayo/AFP/Getty Images. After all, they had been working in remote villages for about a month and a half, collecting mosquitoes for a malaria study. And both of the researchers had been bitten numerous times by numerous different kinds of mosquitoes. “We’d work into the late evening with shorts and sandals,” Foy remembers. So, it made sense that they caught the virus while they were there.But then, Foy’s wife got sick too. She hadn’t been to Senegal. She hadn’t even left northern Colorado for a while, but she had many of the same symptoms: sensitivity to light, a rash, swollen joints, muscle pain, and bloodshot eyes. In fact,

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Donald Trump thinks women should dress a certain way. Twitter proved him wrong.

Dress, pants, skirts, shorts — wear what you want.
Coming from the world of reality TV and beauty pageants, it’s no surprise that President Donald Trump has a pretty serious interest in the optics of any given situation — with a focus on people who look the part and less about if they’re actually able to do the job.Whether talking about “his generals,” his cabinet, or his vice president, Trump often puts an emphasis on on looking “straight from central casting” (yes, he really said that) as one of the things he seeks in candidates for just about any position. Trump poses with Miss USA 2012, Olivia Culpo, in Las Vegas. Photo by David Becker/Getty Images. But it was a line from a recent article at Axios that had people scratching their heads (emphasis mine): “Trump likes the women who work for him ‘to dress like women,’ says a source who worked on Trump’s campaign. ‘Even if you’re in jeans, you need to look neat and orderly.’ We hear that women who worked in Trump’s campaign field offices — folks who spend more time knocking on doors than attending glitzy events — felt pressure to wear dresses to impress Trump.'”What does it mean to “dress like a woman”?How aren’t we past this by now? It’s a statement that certainly gives off a very Victorian vibe. May 1884: Late Victorian flower show and garden party dresses, with high bustles and fitted corset lines. Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images. It’s 2017! Are you a woman? Are you wearing clothes? If you answered “yes” to both questions, congratulations! You’re dressed like a woman! In response, people took to Twitter to provide some powerful examples of what it means to #DressLikeAWoman whether you’re at work… Me & my son; he’s dressed like a man & I am dressed like a woman. In case you couldn’t tell. #DressLikeAWoman pic.twitter.com/nVM2Emssj2— Tara Wildes (@TaraWildes) February 3, 2017 Got the memo @realDonaldTrump This is how to #DressLikeAWoman pic.twitter.com/828oNwuK4k— Linda Springer (@springer1lind

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Tough week, huh? You might have missed these 7 awesome things that happened.

Hey, quick question: How are you doing? Are you hanging in there?It’s been a rough couple of weeks, no doubt about that. You don’t need a recap; just flip on the news or check Facebook, and you’ll be knocked over by the avalanche of horrifying political developments that have taken place over the past 14 days.It’s a little overwhelming, to be honest. Things have felt hopeless, and even all the good people out there fighting for what’s good and right sometimes seem like just a drop in the ocean.But I’m here to tell you it’s not all bad! A lot of it is bad, definitely. But, somewhere scattered underneath all the rubble of alternative facts, Muslim bans, and special operations gone horrendously wrong is evidence that this world we live in is, indeed, worth the fight.Victories big and small are happening, along with pieces of news that are just a welcome reprieve from the madness.Here are seven awesome things that happened this week you may not have heard about.1. An amazing federal judge in L.A. demanded an Iranian man with a valid visa be allowed into the country. Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images. According to Matt Hamilton of the L.A. Times, Ali Vayeghan had been waiting for years to fly from Tehran to see his son in Los Angeles. He just so happened to book his journey right as Donald Trump’s already infamous executive order came down.Vayeghan was detained when he arrived at LAX and promptly sent back to Iran by way of Dubai.ACLU lawyers petitioned the courts and won a decision to honor Vayeghan’s travel visa, but by then he was back in Dubai. So U.S. District Judge Dolly M. Gee told authorities to transport him back to the U.S. immediately.No word yet on whether Vayeghan has been reunited with his son in the U.S., but knowing there are judges out there willing to uphold the Constitution is a victory in its own right.2. We thought this adorable frog was extinct but recently discovered it was just hiding!Science and discovery still matter, damnit. Just ask

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13 photos capture the stunning diversity of one very universal experience: dinner.

Dinner is much more than just what you eat.
In times when the world seems divided on just about everything, it’s helpful to look at what we have in common — even something obvious.That’s what photographer Lois Bielefeld was aiming for with “Weeknight Dinners,” a conceptual portrait series centered around typical evening meals, which she shot between 2013 and 2015. For Bielefeld, it was a way to document a near-universal experience that everyone can relate to. It’s a display of common ground in one of its most basic senses. Monday: Eric and Sally. 2013. All photos courtesy of Lois Bielefeld Photography. The concept for the series emerged from Bielefeld’s own interest in the social power of food.Growing up, Bielefeld’s chores included making a weekend meal, which was a family bonding event in and of itself. “I was less into the actual food until I got older and started regularly cooking and finding my own tastes,” she says. “But even at a young age, I recognized food brings people together and is a way to explore different cultures.”For her, “Weeknight Dinners” is an extension of her own family’s ritual, an exploration in other people’s dinner habits. Wednesday: Siena, Brian, Alivia and Leah. 2013. Wednesday: Willie Mae. 2013 Wednesday: Emilio, Rhonda, Benedetto, Skylrae, Jacomo. 2014 Bielefeld chose to focus the series on weeknights for an important reason.During the week, our rituals are shaped by the world around us. Work, school, and home — how we prepare for a meal between Monday and Thursday tends to differ from how we might dine on the weekends. For some, weeknight cooking might mean a plate of leftovers; for others, perhaps a microwave meal or carry-out. No matter what it is, no matter where you eat it, and no matter who you’re with, it’s simply a common part of most of our lives. Wednesday: Glynis, Liam, Jorin, and Mona. 2013 Wednesday: Kathy. 2013 Wednesday: Natalia and Maryanne. 2014 The project also provides insight into how people actually ar

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Before you click 'send' on anything else, read this comic. It's important.

Everyone seems to be clicking “send” a bit too early nowadays. We officially live in a world where internet trigger-happy world leaders can send massive populations into a devolved tail spin with erratic tweets, posts, and subsequent responses. These posts can have far-reaching consequences, and in the haste to respond in kind we’ve forgotten that we’ve normalized this kind of attitude. Boulet is a French comic artist who has been writing about this for 15 years.Originally he started writing an autobiographical series, but when he realized how accessible it was to his readers, he decided to make it fictional. “So it’s mostly ‘drawn stand up comedy,'” he explains. “I’m the main character, but in the same way comedians are there own character when they are on stage. The purpose is not really to talk about me but about situations of everyday’s life everyone can relate to.” In his words, “The comic (below) was an anecdote about a Facebook mistake, I had basically two choices: Use it as a Facebook status to make my friends laugh or try to dramatize the whole process into an internal crisis to make it a story.” Comic by Bouletcorp, where it originally appeared. Used here with permission. ‌‌‌‌‌‌‌That “internal crisis” is something Boulet is very interested in. Boulet enjoys using the accessible medium of cartoons as a way to explore complex issues. He loves learning about and studying consciousness and neuroscience. His fans enjoy this. “There were fun discussions in the comments about how the brain works … the very idea that we have a parallel process that can interfere, overlap or get in conflict is actually a thing. What I found most intriguing about this story was to literally feel my hand freeze BEFORE I could put an explanation on the WHY it froze.”He also had a great suggestion as to figuring out the motivations behind certain posts. “We should always go on social networks with EEGs on. We would learn a lot.”After what we’ve seen on social media over the

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This life-changing program pairs combat vets with horses. The results are amazing.

A woman stopped Christianna Capra at the Marine Ball. “Thank you for saving my husband’s life,” the stranger said, before giving her a big hug. It wasn’t the first time Capra had been thanked so profusely. It won’t be the last. As the co-founder of Spring Reins of Life, a New Jersey nonprofit focused on equine-assisted psychotherapy, she has helped more than 700 combat veterans, nearly 1,000 high-risk youth, and 100 kids grieving or dealing with trauma. But Capra takes little of the credit. “The horses are the ones that do the work,” she says. “I’m merely a conduit that allows them to do the work.”In the video below, veterans take part in Spring Reins of Life’s “Operation Horse.” Read on to discover how this life-changing program came to be. Christianna “CC” Capra literally grew up a horse-person — well, almost. “From about the age of 2 to about 6, I became a horse,” Capra says with a laugh. “You had to feed me out of your hand and I wore one of my mother’s hair pieces — as a tail. So that was kind of how it started.” She was obsessed. Capra found ways to be around horses as much as possible and she got her own at 11 years old. Soon after though, she had to give up horses when she moved to New York in high school. It would be nearly a decade before Capra would be back in the saddle. In 1997, her job in publicity helped her afford her “horse habit” again, and Capra purchased a horse that’s still with her today. But it was an offhand suggestion at the veterinarian’s office that led Capra to her life’s work. Through one of her veterinarians, Capra learned about the Equine Assisted Growth and Learning Association (EAGALA). Founded in 1999, EAGALA is an international nonprofit association for professionals interested in using horses to address mental health needs. “I read the website start to finish and I pulled out my wallet and my credit card that night and signed up for both trainings, sight unseen,” she says. “I knew, beyond any shadow of a doubt, this was

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These 23 photos prove that dogs are just as fed up with the world as humans are.

Over the past few weeks, millions of people around the world have taken to the streets to protest. Whether it was for the Women’s March or in response to Trump’s controversial executive order banning immigrants and refugees, people took action and flooded the streets and nearby airport terminals to demand change.But enough about them. It’s time we talked about their dogs.That’s right. Dogs around the world are fed up too. Want proof? Here are 23 protest dogs who pounded the pavement (with their paws!) along with their human counterparts.1. Take this stylish pup, Agador, who loves nasty women and doesn’t care who knows. Photo by @poochofnyc, shared with permission. 2. We’re not sure if this dog is tired of all the marching or all the BS. Good thing the sign does all the talking. Photo by Hector Guerrero/AFP/Getty Images​. 3. This fluffy pup knows exactly what we need more of: hugs. Photo by Sister Marches/Flickr. The line forms behind me. 4. As two of America’s greatest women, Amy Poehler and Tina Fey, once said, “Bitches get shit done.” Photo by Lluis Gene/AFP/Getty Images. 5. Repeat after this dog: Her voice matters! She is the future! Photo by Devon Christopher Adams/Flickr. 6. Know your strengths. Andre does. Photo by @woke_pupper/Twitter, shared with permission. Hey, we’ve gotta admire a dog who knows what he’s good at and is willing to take action. 7. Sometimes you’re too cool to wear a sign and you settle for a pink hat instead. Photo by Robert N. Clinton (CyberShutterbug)/Flickr. Same message, different medium. That’s one smart dog. 8. This bully is begging you to read it (the sign, duh) and weep. Photo by Sister Marches/Flickr. 9. Margaux just wants you to fight for your rights, OK? Photo by Kate Trainor, used with permission. 10. No ban. No wall. No questions about what this dog’s sign is asking you to do. Photo by Rachael Prokop/Greenpeace, shared with permission. 11. Man’s best friend. Woman’s best friend. Democracy’s best friend. Photo

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Check out Budweiser's powerful Super Bowl ad celebrating immigrants.

‘Go back home!’ — a message immigrants have been hearing for a while now.
In 1857, a man named Adolphus Busch arrived in America. As an immigrant from Germany, he stood out. Some people didn’t like that. Like many other immigrants in the 1800s, he faced hardships on his journey to find his new home. But he finally made it to where he was meant to be. Busch, of course, is the Busch of Anheuser-Busch — the world’s largest beer producer. And it’s his American story being told in a new Super Bowl ad for Budweiser:Given today’s political climate, the ad’s pro-immigrant sentiment has people talking.The ad — showing Busch overcoming xenophobic attitudes held by early colonists — was released amid talks of President Donald Trump’s controversial U.S.-Mexico border wall and just days after Trump signed an executive order banning travel to the U.S. by green card holders and refugees from seven predominantly Muslim countries. The ban prompted protests in airports across the country. It resulted in Attorney General Sally Yates being fired by Trump for refusing to defend its legality. Lawyers swooped in immediately, many working pro bono, to defend those affected in transit. And dozens of celebrities and influencers slammed the ban as an attack on civil rights.And believe it or not, Anheuser-Busch dove into white-hot political territory with this ad … on accident. Demonstrators protest Trump’s travel ban in Chicago. Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images. Anheuser-Busch didn’t intend for the ad — which it’s been developing for nearly a year — to be political.The commercial was conceptualized long before Trump’s travel ban was signed and the announcement of his controversial proposal to pay for the U.S.-Mexico border wall using an import tariff. The brand wanted to “celebrate those who embody the American spirit” by recapping one of its founder’s early days in America — not throw in its two cents when it comes to immigration policy.Marcel Marcondes, vice president of m