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25 things to do during the inauguration if you're afraid of the Trump presidency.

Inauguration Day is upon us. Soon, President Barack Obama will sail off into the sunset, and Donald J. Trump will be sworn in as our new commander in chief. Yup. Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images. There’s no stopping this. As of Jan. 20, Trump will be your president and mine. If you’re feeling lost or hopeless, it’s OK. A lot of people are feeling the same. It may be too late to undo the results of the election, but it’s never too late to do whatever you can to stand up for what you believe in. What better time to turn your feelings into action than than during the inauguration itself? Here are 25 things you can do during Trump’s inauguration ceremony to make the world a slightly less scary place: 1. Make donations to organizations whose work will be more important than ever in the next four years.Lots of important and life-saving organizations are going to need your help to survive a Trump administration, and they rely heavily on donations like yours. If you have some cash to spare, consider a one-time or recurring donation to Planned Parenthood, (which is hosting a $20 donation drive  on Jan. 20), the NRDC, the International Refugee Assistance Project, or the Trevor Project for LGBTQ Youth. There’s also the NAACP, the National Network of Abortion Funds, Black Girls Code, the ACLU, National Women’s Law Center, NARAL, Girls Write Now, the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, and Purple Purse. That’s just to name a few.2. Call or write to your representatives to let them know you want them to stand against attacks on civil rights.I know, you’ve probably heard that suggestion about a thousand times. Well there’s a reason: It works! It’s also a lot easier than you think. Look up who your representative is and find their publicly available contact information. Then you can call or write a message to them saying that, as their constituent, you hope they will stand by the issues that make a difference to you. Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images. Don

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Everyone who wants to resist Trump should read this new manual.

Like many young activists of her generation, Johnetta Elzie got her first taste of resistance online — speaking out against the 2011 execution of Troy Davis to her then-small Twitter following. “I was just determined to be a part of the change. I was determined to at least be able to say, ‘I tried,'” Elzie says. Demonstrators protest the execution of Troy Davis at the White House in 2011. Photo by Paul J. Richards/Getty Images. Now a seasoned activist and Black Lives Matter leader with an audience of over 200,000 followers on Twitter, Elzie wants to give Americans opposed to the Trump administration’s policy agenda the tools they need to fight back. Elzie co-created the Resistance Manual, a Wiki-style guide to pushing back against the Trump administration. The guide, launched by Elzie and her colleagues in Campaign ZERO — Deray McKesson, Sam Sinyangwe, and Brittany Packnett — is broken down by policy area, detailing the Trump administration’s strategy for implementing the policy, the potential impact of the policy, vulnerabilities in the strategy, and ways anyone can take action to stop or slow it. Topics include the Affordable Care Act, mass incarceration, women’s rights/reproductive justice, and immigration, among others. Image via Resistance Manual. Pooling their knowledge, the Black Lives Matter veterans included a list of background reading, tips on how to spot fake news stories, and organizations working on the issues in play.”We wanted to at least do our part to give people a closer look at the resources and the people that we know,” Elzie explains.The manual is one of several efforts to organize opposition to Trump from the ground up in the wake of the election. In December, four former Democratic congressional staffers published “Indivisible: A Practical Guide for Resisting the Trump Agenda,” which includes advice for citizen organizing modeled on the Tea Party’s strategy from early in President Barack Obama’s term. Meanwhile, the Women’s March o

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'We the People' updates Shepard Fairey's 2008 'Hope' poster for the Trump years.

No matter who is in office, hope and change will always be possible.
Artist Shepard Fairey’s “Hope” poster is, perhaps, one of the defining images from the 2008 campaign to elect President Barack Obama.The image, as ubiquitous in 2008 as Donald Trump’s red “Make America Great Again” caps were in 2016, inspired optimism for a world no longer defined by political party. Red and blue, the poster signaled a desire for our politicians to work together for a common good. The global recession had just begun, and it would take teamwork from individuals across the political spectrum to help us recover. Photo by Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images. Fairey and five other artists recently teamed up with The Amplifier Foundation to share a new political message for 2017 and beyond, this time no longer centered on any one politician.   The project, which debuts on Inauguration Day, is titled “We the People” and grapples with the role we play as individuals and groups to stand up for each other. The poster series features work by Fairey as well as Colombian-American muralist Jessica Sabogal, Los Angeles artist Ernesto Yerena, photographer Delphine Diallo, multimedia artist Arlene Mejorado, and Ridwan Adhami.The Amplifier Foundation’s mission is to raise the voices of grassroots movements through art and community engagement. Images by Ernesto Yerena (left) and Shepard Fairey (right). On Inauguration Day, the group will take out full-page ads in The Washington Post and distribute copies of the posters throughout D.C.The message of the series is centered around a feeling of shared humanity and a responsibility to be our best selves in how we treat ourselves and others. The people depicted in the images come from a wide range of backgrounds. The goal is to inspire the viewer to empathize with the subject, no matter how much or how little we may truly have in common with them.”Anyone that looks at these images can see some amazing humanity in them,” said Fairey in an Amplifier Found

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Some cities are going to lose their perfect weather to climate change. How'd you do?

What’s the weather in your city like right now?In Seattle, everyone’s walking around with umbrellas and overcoats. We’re all waiting for nice, mild weather to return come spring. But is that nice, mild weather still going to be there in 100 years?Scientists have studied how climate change is going to affect big, dramatic weather events. We’re pretty sure hurricanes will become stronger and droughts may be longer and more intense, but there hasn’t been a lot of time devoted to nicer days. Now scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Princeton University are tackling just that.They’ve found the United States is in for slightly milder winters but will be ravaged by harsher summers. What the U.S.’s weather might look like in 2100. Blue is nice. Brown is not. Image from Karin Van Der Wiel/NOAA/Princeton University. The researchers defined mild weather as 64-86 degrees Fahrenheit with low humidity and low rain. Picnic weather, in other words. They used two supercomputers, named Gaea and Theia, to predict both a 2016-2035 range and a 2081-2100 range. So how does your city stack up? Virtually all U.S. cities conform to this mild-winter, harsh-summer theme. Numbers-wise, Seattle and Los Angeles will have their harsh summers balanced out by the milder winters. But others … yikes. Chicago could lose nine days of good weather by 2100. And Miami … dude, I’m sorry, Miami. By the end of this century, Miami could lose four weeks of picnic-ready days.Comparatively, America isn’t that badly hit. If you’re one of the 644,000 people in Southeast Asia, 1.2 billion Africans, or 1.3 billion people in India, well, we’ve got some bad news. Those regions are pretty thoroughly on the fewer-perfect-days side of the equation. 2100. Image from Karin Van Der Wiel/NOAA/Princeton University. Mild weather matters a lot more than you might think.Weather affects a ton of businesses — just think about sports. It’s one thing to watch a baseball game on a mild

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He has one of the world's rarest birth defects. Here's what the experience taught his mom.

The inspiring story of how a mother’s love conquered people’s fear.
When Lacey Buchanan was 23 weeks pregnant, she was told that her baby would probably die. After her 18-week ultrasound, doctors had noticed something was wrong. Most likely, they told her, it was a cleft palate. But as more time passed, they grew increasingly concerned. And by the time she arrived at the hospital to deliver her baby, no one knew if he would live.To everyone’s surprise, though, her son was born and he survived.But he was born with a condition so rare that it’s one of only 50 recorded cases in the world — Tessier cleft lip and palate, classifications 3, 4, and 5. This condition, induced by amniotic band syndrome, caused her son’s skull to fail to knit together in the womb, resulting in a large V-shaped cleft from his mouth into his eyes. As a result, Christian was born without eyes. He couldn’t even close his mouth. The team at Vanderbilt University Medical Center had never seen a case like it. Image via Lacey Buchanan, used with permission. Lacey and her husband, Chris, were overjoyed that their son was alive. But they were also completely overwhelmed. They couldn’t take their newborn home right away, and he needed surgery when he was just four days old to close an exposed part of his head. Then, before he turned three months old, Christian needed a second surgery.For Lacey, this was extremely difficult.Not only was she a new mom with a baby in and out of the hospital, but she was also a law student with a full-time job. It was hard to balance everything, and at one point, she said, she had a breakdown.”I was thankful that Christian had lived, but there was a point when I started saying, ‘Why me? Why my child? What have I done to deserve this?'” she recalls. “Motherhood can make you feel so ill-equipped,” she says. “It can make you feel like you’re constantly failing. Am I doing enough? Am I screwing up this little tiny human?” Image via Lacey Buchanan, used with permissio

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Tyler Perry's powerful People's Choice Awards speech is exactly what 2017 needs.

On Jan. 18, 2017, Tyler Perry was honored as Favorite Humanitarian at the People’s Choice Awards in Los Angeles. Photo by Christopher Polk/Getty Images for People’s Choice Awards. Perry’s nonprofit, the Perry Foundation, has funneled millions of dollars toward groups like Charity Water and Feeding America as well as taken aim at ending homelessness and supporting civil rights issues.On stage accepting the honor, Perry began his speech on a somewhat peculiar topic: the safety regulations of the building he was standing in.It’s standard the facility abides by important rules, Perry noted, like having a sprinkler system in place and fire extinguishers at hand, should they be needed. But he also mentioned what would happen if, suddenly, the lights were to go out.”If the lights go out in this building right now, there are these little lights — you see them on the wall, they have back-up batteries in them,” Perry explained. “And what will happen is, it will light your way out of the darkness.” Photo by Christopher Polk/Getty Images for People’s Choice Awards. Those battery-powered lights, he argued, can teach us an important life lesson. Perry’s speech focused on becoming a positive force for good in other people’s lives when they need it most.“What I have found, and what’s been so important to me right now, is that — as I look at the state of the world and the state of our country and everything that is going on, it is so important that we know that no matter how dark it gets, we all have to be light for each other.” Perry sat next to Ellen DeGeneres, who won Favorite Humanitarian at the 2016 People’s Choice Awards. Photo by Christopher Polk/Getty Images for People’s Choice Awards. Perry continued (emphasis added):”You turn on your phone, you turn on your television, you’re met with darkness, negativity, death, destruction, terrorism, murder, hate, racism. You know, you don’t even need to search for it, because it’s searching for you. It can find you. It’s righ