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16 terrifying pics of Spain's growing desert you should show a climate-change denier.

If nothing changes, southern Spain will be a desert by 2100. If you’re headed to the beach in southern Spain, this probably isn’t what you’re envisioning: Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images. In July, this duo was spotted sunbathing at the Entrepenas reservoir in Duron, the second largest reservoir in Spain.And the pics really are worth a thousand words. Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images. The reservoir has shrunken dramatically as water levels drop. Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images. The receding water has given way to cracked, arid soil…   Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images. …and abandoned relics reflecting a region that once revolved around life on the water. Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images. Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images. Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images. Like the reservoir itself, tourism, and the local economy that benefits from it, are drying up too. Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images. Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images. Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images. So, what the heck is going on at the Entrepenas reservoir? Where has all the water gone? Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images. The area’s severe drought and dusty countryside are indicative of a larger force shaping landscapes across southern Spain. Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images. Yep, you guessed it: climate change. Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images. A 2016 study spelled disaster for the lush Mediterranean region due to human activity.By 2100, southern Spain will have transformed into a desert, researchers have found — unless drastic measures are taken, like, now, to slash carbon emissions to curb the worsening effects of global warming. Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images. “The effect of the human is to deforest, to replace with agriculture and so on,” lead author of the study, Joel Guiot of Aix-Marseille University, told The Guardian last year.”You change the vegetation cover, the albedo, the humidity in the soil, and you will emphasize the drought when you do that,” he continued, noting the Medi

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A parenting expert said spanking is like breastfeeding. Science says that's nonsense.

“Good Morning Britain” recently hosted two parenting experts for a fiery debate on the topic of spanking as a form of punishment.One of the experts, Katie Ivens from the Campaign for Real Education, had some pretty strong words about why she believed physical punishment was not only OK but part of a healthy “tactile relationship”:”I’m saying we have a tactile relationship with our children; we hug them, we kiss them, we breastfeed them, and so on,” she explained. GIF via Good Morning Britain/YouTube. Using an example from her own life, in which she described firmly “shaking” her kids to deter them from running into the street, Ivens argued that physical punishment not only works but is good for kids, the same way breastfeeding or hugging them might be.Yikes. Unsurprisingly, Ivens’ advice is not grounded in any sort of scientific facts. (The CRE did not immediately respond to a request for comment.)Studies on spanking show it has a negative effect on children.Joan Durrant, a child clinical psychologist and researcher from the University of Manitoba, puts it simply: “The research is really unequivocal at this point.”Though some of the benefits of breastfeeding may be exaggerated, it’s still a healthy, normal, and fruitful way for a mom to bond with her baby, all while providing vital nutrition. Spanking, on the other hand, has never, ever (did we mention ever?) been shown to have a positive outcome for children, according to Durrant.Kids who are spanked are more likely to: show higher levels of aggression, display poorer mental health, have a worse relationship with their parents, perform worse in school, and have slower cognitive development.”Any outcome that has ever been associated is a negative one,” says Durrant. “The only thing [spanking] can do, and unreliably so, is make a child comply in the immediate situation. But the child doesn’t learn anything from that.”If the science is so clear, why does physical punishment remain so prevalent?”Good Morning Britain’s

Entertainment

A juice company dumped orange peels in a national park. Here's what it looks like now.

In 1997, ecologists Daniel Janzen and Winnie Hallwachs approached an orange juice company in Costa Rica with an off-the-wall idea. In exchange for donating a portion of unspoiled, forested land to the Área de Conservación Guanacaste — a nature preserve in the country’s northwest — the park would allow the company to dump its discarded orange peels and pulp, free of charge, in a heavily grazed, largely deforested area nearby. One year later, one thousand trucks poured into the national park, offloading over 12,000 metric tons of sticky, mealy, orange compost onto the worn-out plot. The first deposit of orange peels in 1996. Photo by Dan Janzen. The site was left untouched and largely unexamined for over a decade. A sign was placed to ensure future researchers could locate and study it. 16 years later, Janzen dispatched graduate student Timothy Treuer to look for the site where the food waste was dumped. Treuer initially set out to locate the large placard that marked the plot — and failed.”It’s a huge sign, bright yellow lettering. We should have been able to see it,” Treuer says. After wandering around for half an hour with no luck, he consulted Janzen, who gave him more detailed instructions on how to find the plot.When he returned a week later and confirmed he was in the right place, Treuer was floored. Compared to the adjacent barren former pastureland, the site of the food waste deposit was “like night and day.” The site of the orange peel deposit (R) and adjacent pastureland (L). Photo by Leland Werden. “It was just hard to believe that the only difference between the two areas was a bunch of orange peels. They look like completely different ecosystems,” he explains.The area was so thick with vegetation he still could not find the sign.Treuer and a team of researchers from Princeton University studied the site over the course of the following three years. The results, published in the journal “Restoration Ecology,” highlight just how completely the discarded